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Diplodocus through the years by T-PEKC Diplodocus through the years by T-PEKC
Three reconstructions of Diplodocus carnegii showing how our understanding about the sauropods changed through the years. It was harder to draw the out-dated reconstructions than the new one.

Watercolors, 2009.
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:iconbhut:
bhut Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2015
Interesting job, depicting the same dinosaur so differently in three versions!
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:iconabekowalski:
abekowalski Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
This is cool to see. I couldn't find them, but did you do others like this? And if not, will you at some point do more like this for other taxa?
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013
Thank you! I have done complementary painting to this series which you can see at this link - [link]. Several times I've thought about making similar comparison artwork for Megalosaurus, Tyrannosaurus or Iguanodon, but for one reason or another I pushed those ideas aside. Given the projects I'm probably going to work on the next few months I won't have time drawing something like this, but who knows what will happen in future.
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:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Great concept! Love the color scheme, nicely showing the paleoart transition from drab to colorful you definitely notice in older books. Only slight nitpick I'd have is the ground in the last one. The second one does a nice job showing the old swamp idea but then the final implies we now think they lived in deserts specifically (rather than on dry land as you probably intended). The Morrison Formation was a lush fern prairie as seen in the Carnegie mural: [link]

Not sure why the Morrison is usually depicted as extremely arid and desert-like nowadays except maybe due to Walking With Dinosaurs :)
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2013
Thank you Matt! :)

It's been years since I painted this artwork, and honestly some of the reasons painting parts of it the way you see them, are a bit blurry now. If I recall correct, I did not look for depicting Diplodocus wandering through desert-like environment, although I liked those sceneries in WWD (ignore their inaccuracy). My intention was to depict dried up river bed or dried up flood plain based on the seasonal climate of Morrison, with muddy river sediments forming mudcracks - a typical sedimentary structure for arid and semi-arid environments [link] . The colours though are way off (my fault of course), giving the ground more deserty look.
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:icontheluki986:
Theluki986 Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2013
:iconspazattackplz: You draw the dinoss sooooooo Goood... :iconyourocksonicplz:
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:iconthe-wild-soul:
The-Wild-Soul Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I love the first one it looks like Doc
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:iconthe-wild-soul:
The-Wild-Soul Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Love the third one it looks like Doc
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:iconhelixmaster:
Helixmaster Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2011
i like the first 2 since the third 1 had spikes
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2011
Diplodocus actually had keratinous spikes on its back, so my reconstruction is not based on my own preferences but on fossil evidence.
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:iconhelixmaster:
Helixmaster Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2011
ok. so what were those spikes meant for?
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2011
I don't know if there is a correct answer to this question in the moment. I don't think I know of any studies on the function of this structures. My guess is that spikes were ornamentational structures or had some sort of display function.
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:iconemily-twilight:
emily-twilight Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2011
Wow we owerselvs evolved throu the years.
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2011
Everything evolves. :)
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:iconemily-twilight:
emily-twilight Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2011
Yup :)
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:iconcrash-the-megaraptor:
Crash-the-Megaraptor Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It's quite amazing when you look at dinosaurs THEN, then look at them NOW, and you realise how much we've learnt about them.

I still remember the time Spinosaurus had a short, stocky jaw, and Velociraptor had scales....luckily, I never got to the stage where Iguanodon was a stocky creature with a horn on its nose. XD
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:iconeviecats:
Eviecats Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2010
Haha I love this, I was a HUGE fan of dinosaurs as a child and remember the old versions well! ;)
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2010
Thanks!
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:iconmirroreyesserval:
mirroreyesserval Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2010   Digital Artist
I love that you threw the environments in there too. :) Awesome job.
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2010
Thank you. :)
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:iconbabbletrish:
babbletrish Featured By Owner May 24, 2010  Professional Traditional Artist
Very cool!
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner May 25, 2010
Thanks!
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:iconmalevouvenator:
malevouvenator Featured By Owner May 24, 2010
I remember the second diplodocus in 80th and early 90th.
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner May 25, 2010
More in the 80's in my opinion. It's truth that this type of reconstruction was still popular during the 90's but this happened due to the ignorance of the people who published encyclopedias and other dino-related popular media.
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:iconmalevouvenator:
malevouvenator Featured By Owner May 25, 2010
I think the new look appeared in WWD and now diplodocus now have that neck with iguana spines in the back.
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2010
The new look (which is not that new anymore) became popular probably a decade before WWD get made. I remember old documentaries from the early 90's showing diplodocid dinosaurs with horizontal necks. Actually there were reconstructions of sauropods with horizontal necks even in the 70's, like this painting by Ely Kish - [link] .The only thing WWD popularized in the look of Diplodocus were the keratin spikes on the back.
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:iconcbsorgeartworks:
CBSorgeArtworks Featured By Owner May 24, 2010  Professional Digital Artist
Oooh, nice piece! History of paleontological art is really cool. The swamp theory still makes me laugh. Beautifully done.
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner May 25, 2010
Thank you! :)
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:iconamericanraptor:
AmericanRaptor Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Reminds me of ParaWorld.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
That's an awesome concept, and very good execution.
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2009
Coming from you these words mean a lot. Thank you! :)
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2009
you should have done the one with the sprawled legs and belly under its feet walking through a tram line :lol:
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2009
You're the 3rd or 4th person is saying me this. :lol: Check out my newest work- it's Diplodocus with sprawled legs. :)
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:iconkirillus:
Kirillus Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2009
Good illustration about the part of paleoart's history. In the Moscow Paleontological Museum there is an old Diplodocus carnegii replica with the body position of the first one in your pic but on the reconstruction at the Panorama behind it has the position of the second one:lol:. [link]
P.S Why there is not the FIRST versions of diplodocus reconstruction with the lizard-like foot positions?(here are two omes by Harder and Hay [link] [link])
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2009
What a coincidence! :lol: I've never been in Moscow Paleontological Museum but I'd love to visit it some day. I remember seen pics from the museum in an old book a decade ago. I was disappointed by the outdated skeletal and paleoart reconstructions (the later seems to be a common thing in the countries from Eastern Europe and Russia because of the years of isolation).

Actually I was planing to make four reconstructions for the piece and I wanted the one with lizard like spread legs to be the first. I tried to find some old pics like the ones in your comment but without success. That was strange because I knew I have seen them. There was a moment when I decided that my mind is making a jokes with me and such reconstructions doesn't actually exist. Then I decided to go with what I'm sure is real. :lol: That's why I thank you for the links!

Thanks for the comment! :)
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:iconkirillus:
Kirillus Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2009
Yes...years of isolation made their things but there are other reasons for this...there were (and is) not a good financing to paleontology from government of countries and poor paleontologists doesn't have such money to remake a reposition of skeletons and to call paleoartists to make a full new paleoart content for the museum - and only sometimes they add some skeletons and fossils for museum exposition from patrons and warehouses of the museum. Not so long ago the salary of Moscow paleomuseum paleontologists discreased:(...Nobody from government can understand that from paleontology they can make business... And only paleomuseum of Kirov and Ice Age Museum is improoving due to their replaceable exhibits and replica sells.

When you'l be ready to visit Russia and Moscow Paleomuseum please, tell me about this. Maybe we'll visit the museum together:lol:!

You're welcome.:) Do you will add a lizard-leg sauropod and when?

You are welcome, again;).
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2009
I completely understand what you mean because it's the same in Bulgaria (so there is really a reason why my country was called for the sake of the joke "the 16th Russian republic" before the falling of the Berlin wall :lol: ). I do blame the government for this situation but I see that even countries like USA have similar problems. But there is one big difference. Unlike like us they know how to make business from paleontology and their museums and universities always manage to find some money for their researches and studies. The paleontologists in our National Museum of Natural History hardly find money to make a 5 day long expedition to collect some fossils. You can get a picture of how bad the things are. I really hope to see everything gets better in the future.

If I have a way across Russia you can be sure I'll inform you. It would be good to have a personal guide in the museum! ;)

Honestly, I don't know if I'm going to draw lizard-leg sauropod. It would be good for the sake of my original idea but rigth now I'm wanting to continue with the modern reconstructions. When/if I draw it I'll announce it with journal entry.
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:iconkirillus:
Kirillus Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2009
There are some good news:). In the National Museum-Reserve of the city of Astrachan is planning the reconstruction of the exposition (including paleo hall too). May be there would be some reconstructions of extinct animals which lived in lands of the city: may be of plesiosaurus, bison priscus and mammothus trogontherii.:) The city mayor prepare money to finance the reconstruction of the museum. Something good will happen in tommorow.

I'm waiting for this moment:D.

Ok, good, I think the the lizard-leg diplodocus can wait :).
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:iconover-kill77:
Over-kill77 Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2009
diplodicus in the newist one is incorect he could'nt rear up his neck like that it would snap at the second vertabrae
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2009
Nope, it's correct actually. I'm sorry to say it but your info is a little bit out of date. There are new researches showing that sauropods were able to hold their necks higher than previously thought. Here are some links you could find interesting to read- [link] and [link]
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:iconover-kill77:
Over-kill77 Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2009
your the incorrect one scientist have done coputure modiles and studies showing that if he lifted his head that hight the cartlidge inbetween the bone would span paralising the animal leaving it easy prey for ornithalestes,utharaptor and allosarus
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:iconsaurabhinator:
Saurabhinator Featured By Owner May 24, 2010  Hobbyist Digital Artist
evidence plz
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:icongalliruler:
Galliruler Featured By Owner Dec 7, 2009
It's a very bad idea to fight with T-Pekc, I come from the same site he does (where he first posted these pictures) and the man really does his research. He knows what he is talking about.

Wonderful work as always, T-Pekc, I love the second Diplodocus. I don't know why, though. Haha.
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:iconover-kill77:
Over-kill77 Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2009
oh shut up he does not
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:iconzombiesaurian:
ZombieSaurian Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2009  Student Digital Artist
ahh yes, this reminds us on how stupid we were back then lol this is a great peice, though this won't matter in the future, the head on the first one, shouldn't it be more square?
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2009
If I'm not wrong only Brontosaurus and Camarasaurus were reconstructed with "squared" head. All Diplodocus reconstructions I remember had narrow heads.

I don't know if people were stupid but the truth is they had much less info to work with.
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:icontharos222:
Tharos222 Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2009
great work and good idea :D
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:iconderkompsognatus:
DerKompsognatus Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2009
Looks like the out dated reconstructions got run over by the monster truck of modern science!
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:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2009
Modern paleoart rocks bout I can't deny the fact that old paleoart brings a lot of emotion with it.
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:iconderkompsognatus:
DerKompsognatus Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2009
Indeed, the art of Charles Knight has a kind of emotional value, not to mention the anatomy was pretty accurate for it's age!
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