Shop More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
June 12
Image Size
327 KB
Resolution
1200×749
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
1,384 (1 today)
Favourites
74 (who?)
Comments
32
×
The putative Bulgarian ornithomimosaur by T-PEKC The putative Bulgarian ornithomimosaur by T-PEKC

An extremely speculative commissioned reconstruction of the putative Bulgarian ornithomimosaur, a humeral bone fragment of which is described by Mateus et al. (2010)*. Virtually nothing is known about this animal, besides that it is theropod of probably ornithomimosaurian affinities which lived during (probably) the Early Maastricthian on landmass build of continental types of rocks. All this means that the life appearance reconstruction was based on general interpretation of its possible phylogenetic position and environment based on the regional geology, and correlations with the well known Romanian dinosaurian fauna. What an island dwelling ornithomimosaur looked like? Well, in all honesty, I am not sure at all! I looked at another island dwelling theropod that lived in close proximity and around the same time, the famous Balaur bondoc (yes, it is not as close phylogenetically to ornithomimosaurs as one can hope for drawing adequate analogues, but it is still something), for possible ideas of what the general body proportions may have been. The possible phylogenetic position of the Bulgarian dinosaur inside Ornithomimosauria was also considered (pure speculation), as well as the general “primitiveness” of the Romanian fauna of dwarf dinosaurs. Garudimimus and Beishanlong were somewhat of a starting point for some the anatomy details. The resulting speculative depiction is of somewhat basal ornithomimosaur (thus the hallux) with generally stocky appearance – short legs, short and more barrel shaped body in comparison to derived ornithomimosaurs, as well as proportionally large arms. The head is also proportionally bigger compared to that of ornithomimids, while the neck is fairly standard. The presence of feathers is based on the evidence for feathers in the derived ornithomimosaur Ornithomimus (Zelenitsky et al., 2012)** and on the general predictions about feathery integument in coelurosaurian theropods by the EPB method (Extant Phylogenetic Bracketing). Feathery covering is inspired by ratities.


The image is commissioned as part of the paleontology section of the currently under construction Science Center for kids “Muzeiko” ( www.facebook.com/muzeikobulgar… ; www.dnevnik.bg/detski_dnevnik/… ; I am sorry but there is still no official website in English, or even in Bulgarian for that matter), that will open in Sofia (Bulgaria), in summer 2015. The painting will appear on informative poster which will provide kids with information on what this Bulgarian dinosaur probably is, when it lived, as well as where the specimen was found.


Medium: Acrylics on cardboard

Done: February 2014


This image is photo taken by professional photographer , as part of the digitizing process, which was later digitally edited by me on Photoshop CS2. The image that will appear on the poster will be edited and prepared for print by the folks at POSTSTUDIO, Sofia (Bulgaria) poststudio.bg/prototype/index.… .

 Disclaimer:  The artwork is copyrighted by “Muzeiko” and it is shared here with their permission. All rights reserved by “Muzeiko”. The image cannot be reproduced and/or transmitted in any form without written permission from copyright holder.

*Mateus, O., G. J. Dyke, N. Motchurova-Dekova, G. D. Kamenov, P. Ivanov. 2010. The first record of a dinosaur from Bulgaria.- Lethaia, 43, 1, 88-94.

**Zelenitsky, D. K., F. Therrien, G. M. Erickson, C. L. DeBuhr, Y. Kobayashi, D. A. Ebert, F. Hadfield. 2012. Feathered non-avian dinosaur from North America provide insight into wing origins.- Science, 338, 6106, 510-514.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Great work. I initially had the impression you went a bit too far in making it look "non-ornithomimid", but when I checked Garudimimus's skull/hindlimb proportions, I saw that you were right and I was wrong.
Reply
:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2014
Thank you, Pils! Truth to be told, there is always the possibility that I have gone too far in my speculation, especially with how big I depicted the head, but in general I tried to use Garudimimus's and Beishanlong's proportions as template over which to speculate wildly. Not that I like to make paleoart that speculative, but I think it is still better than the eventual generic ornithomimid that a general artist would have depicted on my place.
Reply
:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Jun 21, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Not much of a fan of doing too speculative artwork, but I've done a bit and understand the situation. It's really annoying once you've got some fragments, and you're more or less forced to infer stuff that might not even be reasonably inferrable - such as the phylogenetic position, "because all those island dwarves are somewhat basal compared to their mainland contemporaries". I bet this is a bona fide assumption waiting to be smashed by more complete remains - not necessarily in the case of the Bulgarian ostrich-mimic, though. Feels a bit awkward when you're used to doing reconstructions of relatively completely known taxa with far smaller margins of error. So yes, I can feel your pain here ;)
Reply
:iconmalcolmraptor:
Malcolmraptor Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I rarely like overly speculative reconstructions, but this particular one is quite amazing. :D
Reply
:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014
Thank you! I am also not a fan of reconstructions THAT speculative, but sometimes we have to work with what's at hand. I would love to see this interpretation rendered inaccurate, if more fossil material from this animal is found one day.
Reply
:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2014
Haha, in many cases this is absolutely true. I am always trying to put some thought in the speculative parts of my work, so thank you for appreciating my efforts. :)
Reply
:iconmalcolmraptor:
Malcolmraptor Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Yup indeed, but the thing is that many people just do some hocus-pocus when reconstructing taxa know from scarce material instead of, well... doing some research and actually think about it. That's why I like this particular one. :lol:
Reply
:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2014
Haha, in many cases this is absolutely true. I am always trying to put some thought in the speculative parts of my work, so thank you for appreciating my efforts. :) (Smile)
Reply
:iconmalcolmraptor:
Malcolmraptor Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Welcome!
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Nice work, it's interesting how you've adapted him to an island inhabitant :)
Reply
Add a Comment: